Eating jelly

Every now and then, for a bit of a laugh, I respond to Tui’s begging by offering her a taste of whatever it is that I’m eating and she’s coveting (avoiding all known dog toxins, like tomatoes and chocolate). She seems to be firmly convinced that any food I eat is delicious, but she won’t actually eat everything. Dolly mixtures, yes. Pasta with pesto, spinach and olives, yes. Mashed banana, no (I think it was the texture).

And – this evening – raspberry jelly (jello, to the Americans amongst us) scored a big paws down. I think she was suspicious of its ability to move unaided: she poked it with her nose and then prodded it with her paw a couple of times, finally leaving it uneaten.

Here she is, jelly on her bed and a confused look on her face.

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4 Responses to Eating jelly

  1. S@sha says:

    What breed of dog is Tui? She’s awfully pretty. On a side note, I really like your herringbone wood floor.

    • exilednzer says:

      She’s half Labrador and half Springer Spaniel: her parents were working dogs who had an illicit love affair and she’s ended up looking like a fairly fine-bred Lab, but has stayed the size of a Springer. It’s a really nice combination of breeds.

      I love the floor too! Our house was built as a council house in 1920, but the powers-that-be definitely provided the workers with better housing then than they do now.

      • S@sha says:

        Okay, I can see both the Springer Spaniel and the Lab. It does seem like it would make a good combination.

        So does a council house mean that it was just subsidized for lower incomes, or that it was specifically for government workers? It seems like it has a pretty spacious yard too, which certainly wouldn’t be the case with current public housing.

  2. exilednzer says:

    Sasha,

    These days council housing is low-cost subsidised housing for people with low incomes (or living on benefits, in many cases), but in 1920 I think it was more for government or local authority workers (but I might be totally wrong). But yes, the standards back then were much better than they are now! And the big garden is partially because ours is a ‘garden city’: it was designed to have a lot of green space, so everybody has a decent garden and there are lots of public parks and greens around the town and lots of trees on the streets. It’s very nice, actually!

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